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How to Make Your Case in the Media


The complete guide to getting your message across in the press and on radio and TV

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Today almost anybody can be called on to make a comment in the media. Business executives, local and national politicians, public officials, voluntary organisation workers and many others might find themselves thrust suddenly into the spotlight.

If you find yourself in this position, you'll need to know how to get your points across if you want to leave a favourable and lasting impression on the people watching you on TV or listening to you on radio - or just reading what you've said in a newspaper or magazine. But how do you score with the media if you've had little or no previous experience? Large companies and political parties spend thousands of pounds on training their top people to face the media.

But you don't have to spend that kind of money to learn how to get your points across with confidence. This book takes you on the inside of the media and shows you just how to handle a whole range of situations you could find yourself in - whether you're taking part in a radio phone-in, giving an interview to the local paper, or being asked for an up-to-the-minute comment on a crisis that's engulfed your organisation.

The book shows you how to formulate the points you want to make in a succinct yet memorable way, then gives you practical advice in putting your message across on the airwaves or in the print media. Whether you're planning to appear in the media for the first time, or want to sharpen up your presentation skills for the future, this practical book will provide the advice you need.

Authors: Peter Bartram and Colin Coulson-Thomas
Price: £14.95
Publisher: New Venture Publishing
Format: Paperback 218mm x 134mm
ISBN: 0-9552336-3-1
978-0-9552336-3-0

Praise for Peter Bartram's and Colin Coulson-Thomas's earlier book on dealing with the media:

"Facing the press can be a harrowing experience for any business person, whether they have got something to hide or not. Well prepared and well armed with this book, you should be able to get your message across with ease and confidence. The authors… give extremely useful checklists and exercises for planning your press campaign, and even how to control your nerves and equilibrium in the face of hostile questions from reporters." - Evening Sentinel

Contents

1 Any comment?

2 Understanding what the media want

  • Five reasons why it's important to put your case
  • Three key roles you must perform as a spokesperson
  • Joining battle in the interview arena
  • Three kinds of interviews you have with journalists
  • Exploiting the four forces that drive journalists
  • How to find the best spokesperson

3 How to reach the people who matter

  • Finding the starting point for a communications campaign
  • Two issues you must address to reach your target audiences
  • Defining the people you need to reach
  • Using media channels to reach your target audiences
  • Sources of media targeting information
  • How to make the human factor work in your favour

4 Creating memorable messages

  • Why effective messages are important
  • Three kinds of messages
  • Using proactive messages to help achieve your objectives
  • How to develop reactive messages that work
  • How to create messages that grab media attention
  • Passing the so-what? test
  • Making sure the basics are in place

5 Great preparation, great performance

  • Three things you must know before you face a journalist
  • What you should know about your interviewer
  • What you should know about the purpose of the interview
  • What you should know about your organisation and messages
  • Situations in which you will face the media

6 How to shine in interviews

  • Eight ways to make a good impression on journalists
  • The essential elements of good interviewee technique
  • What to do in 11 different kinds of interviews
  • Making a picture worth a thousand words

7 How to make your mark on radio and television

  • How to develop a broadcasting policy for your organisation
  • How to set the ground rules for broadcast interviews
  • How to prepare well for a radio or television interview
  • How to control your nerves before the interview starts
  • How to perform well in a broadcast interview

8 Communicating in a crisis

  • Why crisis communication is different
  • How careful planning helps you deal with crisis
  • How to get fair-minded people on your side in a crisis

9 How to do even better next time

  • Evaluating the results of your efforts
  • How to measure the impact you make
  • What to do when it all goes wrong
  • Now it's up to you

This practical book is rich in detailed checklists which are worth the price of the book on their own. The 67 checklists in the book are:

CHECKLISTS

  • Checklist 1: Five reasons key figures need to be spokespeople
  • Checklist 2: Two perspectives: interviewee and interviewer
  • Checklist 3: 10 features of the proactive interview
  • Checklist 4: Nine features of the reactive interview
  • Checklist 5: Nine features of a crisis interview
  • Checklist 6: Eight experienced-based qualities needed by spokespeople
  • Checklist 7: Seven personal qualities needed by spokespeople
  • Checklist 8: 18 potential audiences for a company
  • Checklist 9: 12 potential audiences for a public body
  • Checklist 10: 13 potential audiences for a charity, membership body, or not-for-profit organisation
  • Checklist 11: 15 media channels
  • Checklist 12: 15 company audience messages
  • Checklist 13: 12 public body audience messages
  • Checklist 14: 12 charity, membership body, not-for-profit audience messages
  • Checklist 15: 17 types of bodies that could have an impact on your organisation
  • Checklist 16: 20 sources of information about organisations you need to know about
  • Checklist 17: 10 effective reactive message criteria
  • Checklist 18: 12 features of effective media messages
  • Checklist 19: seven ways to make media messages pass the so-what? test
  • Checklist 20: 14 key issues when developing an image for your organisation
  • Checklist 21: seven facts you must know about key journalists
  • Checklist 22: seven reasons why journalists want interviews
  • Checklist 23: 12 kinds of information a journalist may need at an interview
  • Checklist 24: opportunities and problems in a face-to-face interview
  • Checklist 25: opportunities and problems in a telephone interview
  • Checklist 26: opportunities and problems in a conference call interview
  • Checklist 27: opportunities and problems in an e-mail interview
  • Checklist 28: opportunities and problems at a press conference
  • Checklist 29: opportunities and problems at a press briefing
  • Checklist 30: opportunities and problems on a facility trip or visit
  • Checklist 31: opportunities and problems at an exhibition
  • Checklist 32: opportunities and problems at an annual general meeting
  • Checklist 33: opportunities and problems at a conference or seminar
  • Checklist 34: opportunities and problems during door-stepping
  • Checklist 35: 12 fundamental rules for interviews
  • Checklist 36: five mistakes to avoid in an interview
  • Checklist 37: nine ploys journalists use to trap you
  • Checklist 38: eight ways to score in telephone interviews
  • Checklist 39: six ways to score in a conference call interview
  • Checklist 40: seven ways to score in an e-mail interview
  • Checklist 41: 10 ways to score at a press conference
  • Checklist 42: seven key points for preparing a press conference presentation
  • Checklist 43: five ways to score at a press briefing
  • Checklist 44: five ways to score during a facility trip or visit
  • Checklist 45: seven ways to score at an exhibition
  • Checklist 46: five ways to score at annual general meetings
  • Checklist 47: four ways to score at a conference or seminar
  • Checklist 48: seven ways to score if you're door-stepped
  • Checklist 49: nine ways to be photographed at your best
  • Checklist 50: eight ways you could appear on television
  • Checklist 51: nine ways you could appear on radio
  • Checklist 52: three key issues when deciding on a broadcasting policy
  • Checklist 53: nine facts you must know about a programme on your organisation
  • Checklist 54: eight facts you must know about a programme dealing with specific allegations about your organisation
  • Checklist 55: six reasons for sharing research with programme makers
  • Checklist 56: three ground rules for programme participation
  • Checklist 57: six ways to prepare what you'll say on radio or television
  • Checklist 58: six ways to combat nervousness before an interview
  • Checklist 59: 12 ways to prepare for a broadcast interview with confidence
  • Checklist 60: 12 ways to perform well in a broadcast interview
  • Checklist 61: eight special points to consider in a television interview
  • Checklist 62: six special points to consider in a radio interview
  • Checklist 63: 15 questions to ask when identifying potential crisis hot spots
  • Checklist 64: 14 facilities needed in a crisis press centre
  • Checklist 65: five kinds of information to include in a crisis briefing kit
  • Checklist 66: 10 questions to ask after an interview
  • Checklist 67: 10 ways to collect data about campaign performance

Another book?If you're interested in How to Make Your Case in the Media, you may also find the following useful:

How to Write the Perfect Press Release:
Real-life advice from editors on getting your story in the media
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How to Write Well at Work:
Simple steps to get you writing with fluency and confidence
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How to Make Your Case in the Media

How to Make Your Case in the Media

If you would like to buy this book send a cheque payable to The Bartram Partnership for £15.00 to include post and packing to:

The Bartram Partnership
30 The Meadway
Shoreham-by-sea
West Sussex BN43 5RP

Please allow seven working days for delivery.